Eric Smith Plays Strong At Pangos In Georgia

Eric Smith Plays Strong At Pangos In Georgia

2010 Mullins High point guard Eric Smith made the trip to Georgia to compete in the Pangos All-South Frosh/Soph Camp. He made a strong statement and the South Carolina native and put his name on the national recruiting map with his performance.

NORCROSS, GA -- Dinos Trigonis and Patrick Stanwood put together a great group of prospects for the second ever Pangos All-South Frosh/Soph Camp. The camp, which kicked off Saturday afternoon, gave us a glance at a number of talented 2010, 2011 and even 2012 prospects.

2010 Checklist


Parker Impressed At Camp
Mychal Parker, SF – This was our second look at Parker and we are even more impressed with the 6-foot-6 wing after seeing him against prospects his age. He's quite an athlete that handles the ball well. He didn't have a problem scoring at this camp, as he uses his body well at the rim, and got there with ease. While he was at his best going to the basket, he did manage to mix in a few threes.

Phil Taylor, PG – He's not overly quick or elusive, but he certainly gets the job done. Throughout the weekend, Taylor used hesitation dribbles and crossovers to get by defenders and into the lane. He's already developed an effective floater and is capable of consistently hitting mid-range to deep pull-up jumpers. The Marietta (Ga.) Wheeler standout sees the floor well and had a few sweet passes during the All-South camp.

Eric Smith, PG – There weren't many players that could stop Trae Golden from getting to the basket, but Eric Smith didn't have much of a problem defending the 6-foot-2 scorer. Smith, who is 6-foot, moves well laterally and is already quite strong for his age. On the offensive end he's a decent athlete that is capable of re-adjusting his shots once he gets to the rack. Although his jumper wasn't going down on Saturday, he had good form on his shot. Smith wasn't around for day two of the camp, but if he was he would have surely made the top All-Star game.

Trae Golden, SG/PG – As we mentioned above, Golden virtually scored at will until he met up with Smith, and he still wasn't completely shut down. Golden used drives, spins and body control to score buckets at the rim. He already has a nice, strong frame and uses his body better than most at this stage. Golden also mixed in spot-up and pull-up jumpers from behind the three-point line. The biggest improvement we saw in his game was his explosiveness. The Powder Springs (Ga.) McEachern standout had a bunch of dunks during the event, as he rose up driving baseline and in traffic a handful of times.

DeMarcus Harrison, SG/SF – This 6-foot-4 wing was one of the more consistent prospects in attendance. He didn't have much problem scoring, as he used strong drives, deep jumpers and off the dribble pull-ups to get buckets. He's also an above average athlete that isn't afraid to mix it up around the rim for rebounds and tips. Harrison was named to the top All-Star game.

Jalon Kendricks, SF – The All-South camp was loaded with young, but talented, wings and Kendricks is another guy you can throw into the mix. The 6-foot-5, Southwest Atlanta Christian product is a good athlete that excels in the open court. He didn't shoot many jumpers, but he didn't need to, as he was tough to stop off the dribble and didn't have any problem finishing around the basket.


McRae Showed Off His Hops
Jordan McRae, SF – This 6-foot-5 wing was one of our favorite prospects in the gym Saturday and Sunday. During individual drills he worked hard and showed off the best vertical in the gym. When game time came around he started playing even harder. He drove baseline for dunks, handled the ball well and managed to throw down some nasty jams in transition. To go with his hops, McRae also has a pretty good jump shot. In one of his last camp games, he got hot from the field, as he drained a pair of off the dribble three-pointers and a pair of step-in jumpers.

Marcus Thornton, PF – Thornton proved himself as one of the better bigs in attendance. He stands 6-foot-7 and is very good athlete that runs the floor well and is already a talented shot blocker. Offensively he showed flashes of what's to come. The drop-step move he made on a bigger defender on Sunday was the most impressive move he made all weekend.

Tevin Jones, C – Based on the look test, Jones certainly looked like the biggest prospect in attendance. He's at least 6-foot-8, 215-pounds and is blessed with long arms that help him swat shots. Offensively, he hasn't developed many moves on the block, but at the same time the Raleigh (N.C.) Enloe standout didn't get that many touches in the paint. When he did he usually faded away, or stepped out for mid-range jumpers.

Ryon Wiggins, C – The Atlanta Celtics have a long line of big men and Ryon Wiggins looks to be up next. Wiggins already stands at least 6-foot-8, but his long arms make him look even taller. He's runs the floor well, blocks shots with ease and is active, especially on the defensive end. As it is with most young big men, his defense is ahead of his offense, as he was a terror blocking shots all weekend. Wiggins, who was the best prospect in camp, didn't show many moves on the block, but he did hit the glass and got a bunch of put backs.

Stevie Taylor, PG – The Columbus, Ohio native is quick, shifty and at times flashy. The 5-foot-6 lead man was solid all weekend and played well enough to make the Top 50 all-star game. He already understands how to score and he can do it in a variety of ways, including step-in jumpers, floaters in the lane and three-pointers. Obviously he needs to gain strength, but he is just a freshman. He seems to have a good feel for the game and he's got pretty good vision, especially in the open court.

Tony Kimbro, SG – Despite handling the ball a lot for his team, Kimbro will be projected at the wing spot. The 6-foot-4, 175-pounder is, however, at his best when the ball is in his hands, as he hasn't quite learned how to move with out the ball. We also must remember that he hasn't played a game of high school basketball, and he's a very good athlete with a consistent jump shot. His father stood 6-foot-8, so we'd also be surprised if Kimbro was done growing. Louisville hasn't produced a big time player in a few years and the Louisville (Ky.) Manual product is certainly gifted enough to eventually be a high-major player.


Gbinjie Showed Scoring Touch
Michael Gbinjie, SF – This 6-foot-5 wing already has a smooth game. He handles the ball well and is very consistent shooting the ball off the catch and off the bounce. In one game he hit a handful of mid-range jumpers, but also showed the ability to get all the way to the rack and finish. This is certainly someone for high-majors to keep an eye on down the road.

Henry Brooks, PF – Throughout the event, Brooks, who is 6-foot-7 and headed to Fairburn (Ga.) Landmark Christian, showed off a skilled game. He's already developed a few moves around the basket, including a right hand jump hook. One of his best qualities is his mobility. In his last camp game, he ran the length of the floor, made a great catch in traffic and finished over Ryon Wiggins on the right side.

Jarrel Rankin, PG – For the second weekend in a row Rankin impressed on-lookers. What impressed us the most was his unselfishness and ability to find the open man in the half court and in transition. He's a solid athlete and is capable of re-adjusting shots at the rim. Defenders had a tough time keeping up with him, as he's quick and elusive. He can shoot it too, as he showed in the top All-Star game when he hit a few jumpers, including one three-pointer.

To go with the 2010 and 2011 prospects, there was also a pair of talented eighth graders that took part in the event. Tony Parker, of Lithonia, Ga., and Justin Anderson, of Fredericksburg, Va., are both names to keep an eye on in the future. Parker is a 6-foot-8, 215-pound big man that has already developed some moves in the paint. Anderson is a 6-foot-5 athlete that excels at driving to the basket.

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